Richard H Clarida: The Federal Reserve's new monetary policy framework - a robust evolution

Speech (via webcast) by Mr Richard H Clarida, Vice Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington DC, 31 August 2020.

Central bank speech  | 
31 August 2020
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Last week, the Federal Reserve reached an important milestone in its ongoing review of its monetary policy strategy, tools, and communication practices with the unanimous approval and release of a new Statement on Longer-Run Goals and Monetary Policy Strategy. In my remarks today, I will discuss our new framework and highlight some important policy implications that flow from the revised statement and our new strategy. I believe that this new statement and strategy represent a critical and robust evolution of our framework that will best equip the Federal Reserve to achieve our dual-mandate objectives on a sustained basis in the world in which we conduct policy today and for the foreseeable future.

I will divide my remarks into four parts. First, I will discuss the factors that motivated the Federal Reserve in November 2018 to announce it would undertake in 2019 the first-ever public review of its monetary policy strategy, tools, and communication practices. Second, I will discuss the review process itself, with particular focus on the economic analysis and public input the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) drew on as it contemplated, over the past 18 months, potential changes to its policy framework. Third, I will briefly summarize the flexible inflation-targeting strategy that has been guiding U.S. monetary policy since 2012 in the context of some important changes in the economic landscape that have become evident since 2012. Fourth, I will discuss the major findings of the review as codified in our new Statement on Longer-Run Goals and Monetary Policy Strategy and highlight some important policy implications that flow from them. Finally, I will offer some brief concluding remarks before joining in conversation with my good friend Adam Posen, which, as always, I very much look forward to.