Follow-up Basel III implementation assessment reports published by the Basel Committee

24 March 2017

Press release

Today the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision published overviews of post-RCAP follow-up actions taken by member jurisdictions to address deviations from the Basel standards identified in their RCAP assessments. This covers those jurisdictions whose RCAP assessment reports were published by December 2015, namely: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, Hong Kong SAR, India, Japan, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland and the United States.

The follow-up reports are published on the Basel Committee's website alongside the original RCAP assessment reports. These reports are provided by the authorities in each jurisdiction. The actions taken have not been reviewed or evaluated by the Basel Committee.

A summary of follow-up actions taken by member jurisdictions is also published on the Basel Committee's website.

The Committee will publish in 2018 overviews of post-RCAP follow-up actions taken by member jurisdictions assessed in 2016.



Notes to editors

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision consists of senior representatives of bank supervisory authorities and central banks. Member countries include Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The RCAP (Regulatory Consistency Assessment Programme) is a central element of the Basel Committee's continuing efforts to promote timely adoption of its standards and to monitor its members' full and consistent compliance with the Basel framework. The RCAP also helps member jurisdictions identify deviations from the Basel framework, weigh the materiality of any deviations and undertake necessary reforms. Based on the findings of these assessments, many assessed jurisdictions have already amended their regulations to align them more closely with the Basel framework, thereby helping to promote global financial stability and a level playing field for internationally active banks.