Ryan Niladri Banerjee

Ryan Niladri Banerjee

Principal Economist
CGFS - Committee on the Global Financial System

Ryan Banerjee's current research interests cover corporate finance and monetary policy. His research agenda on the growth and impact of zombie firms, corporate reallocation and inflation risks has attracted significant interest in policy circles as well as the media. Ryan's responsibilities have included preparing discussion papers for the BIS's bimonthly Global Economy Meeting of central bank Governors and as the secretary to various cross-central bank working groups. Prior to joining the BIS in 2012, Ryan was a senior economist at the Bank of England, where his responsibilities included the quantitative easing programme and liquidity regulation. Ryan holds a PhD in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Fields of interest

  • Corporate finance
  • Monetary policy
  • Prices and wages

11 items
October 2021

by E Sette, Enrico Sette, Leonardo Gambacorta, R Banerjee and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Journal of Financial Intermediation
September 2021

by K Blickle and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in European Economic Review
forthcoming
Disagreeing during inflations

by Aaron Mehrotra and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Journal of Money, Credit and Banking
November 2019

by Fabrizio Zampolli and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Economic Modelling
July 2018

by H Mio and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Journal of Financial Intermediation
February 2020

by Aaron Mehrotra, Boris Hofmann and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in BOFIT Discussion Papers
January 2020
Disagreeing during deflations

by Aaron Mehrotra and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Journal of Money, Credit and Banking
November 2016

by Giovanni Lombardo, M Devereux and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in Journal of International Money and Finance
2014

by D Latto, N Mclaren and Ryan Niladri Banerjee

in The Economic Journal
2013
Flexible inflation targeting: performance and challenges

by Boris Hofmann, Ryan Niladri Banerjee and Stephen G. Cecchetti

in Is inflation targeting dead? Central banking after the crisis